Five Tips for Dealing With a Declined Credit Card
News from Fox Business:

Credit cards can cut you off for a variety of reasons. Here’s what to do in response.

1Your card was declined, but why?

Bankrate.com

What are five words you never want to hear from a waiter?

“Your credit card was declined.”

It happens all the time for a variety of reasons. You may be over your credit limit. Your credit score may have dropped, or the credit card company may suspect that the card is being used fraudulently.

And it gets worse from there. That sliver of plastic in your wallet may now be worthless — at least temporarily — yet those card bills just keep coming.

But, you have rights. A slew of consumer protections, including the 4-year-old Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act, require issuers to treat you with respect, even if you’re not their favorite customer anymore.

Here are five things to consider if your credit card has been declined.

2The issuer can’t demand immediate payment

Bankrate.com

Your charging privileges may be gone. But you still have time to pay off your balance.

Federal law gives the card issuer a couple of options. It can…………… continues on Fox Business

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Five ways to raise your credit score
News from Market Intelligence Center:

Are you worried about your credit score? You are not alone. As adults, few things can impact our lives to the extent that a poor credit score can. Lower scores affect your ability to get a loan, as well as the…………… continues on Market Intelligence Center

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Five Tips For Negotiating a Mortgage
News from Toronto Star:

Five Tips For Negotiating a Mortgage

Key advice for negotiating a mortgage? Know your goals, understand your credit score – and do your research.

When you’re buying your first house, negotiating for the mortgage can seem like the least fun and most complicated part of the process. But having no experience making one of life’s biggest purchases doesn’t mean you’re destined to pay the bank’s listed rate. Follow these five expert-approved tips to make you a better negotiator.

Know your long-term goals
Farhaneh Haque, director of Mortgage Advice for TD Canada Trust in Toronto says most first-time home buyers don’t realize the average person owns their first home for only three years. It’s important to think about where you might be in the next three to five years, she says. “Ask yourself: How long do you anticipate living in this property? Will your life change dramatically in the next few years? How stable is your income?” For example, if you know your employer wants to transfer you sometime in the next 18-months, a five-year, fixed-term mortgage isn’t the right fit for you. This step helps you identify what needs you might have so you know the characteristics…………… continues on Toronto Star

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Five important rules about your new smartphone
News from CNET News:

Did Santa bring you your first smartphone? Awesome! Now for the bad news: it probably didn’t come with much in the way of an instruction manual.

You can figure out a lot of the features just by fiddling, but there are a few general concepts that might not seem clear. Have no fear: I’m here to help you learn the important smartphone basics.

JuiceDefender for Android does a good job making the battery last longer.

(Credit: Latedroid)

1. Battery life will disappoint

The hard truth: You’ll be lucky to get a day or two of smartphone runtime before needing to recharge. Want to stretch battery life as far as possible? Start by dropping the screen brightness to around 50 percent. You’ll hardly notice the dif…………… continues on CNET News

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Verizon Wireless to start charging credit card convenience fee
News from Examiner:

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Five Tips for Building Your Credit Score
News from Patch.com:

This year I have had three prospects who previously paid cash for all of their purchases and, therefore, had no credit score. Consequently, they were not able to purchase a home and had to lease while they built a credit history.

It is fine to pay cash for items that are in the lower price point, but when it comes to purchasing real estate, seldom is cash possible for most consumers.

A credit score is the vehicle that mortgage companies use to evaluate a borrower. The higher the credit score, the better the loan terms will be, but one must at least have a score to be considered for a loan.

There are plenty of warnings about abusing credit, but rarely do you hear about how to effectively use credit for the benefit of the consumer. Credit, used wisely, is essential in today’s world. No credit history means no mortgage until credit is used for at least six months to establish a history.

If a home purchase is in the future plans, establish exce…………… continues on Patch.com

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First credit card? Five key tips for college students.
News from Christian Science Monitor:

If getting a credit card is a rite of passage for college students, choosing the right plastic and learning how to use it responsibly is a matter of life and debt. Young people age 18 to 24, carry an average credit card debt of $ 2,002, according to CreditKarma.com. Before you end up as a debt statistic, learn to pick the right card and manage your credit before getting your hands on plastic. Here are five things every new credit cardholder should know:

Getting a first credit card (like the Central Michigan University student in this file photo) is a rite of passage for many college students. Be sure to be selective when you apply for one. (Ben Garvin/The Christian Science Monitor)

Think of your credit score as a…………… continues on Christian Science Monitor

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How to raise credit scores: Five tips
News from The Seattle Times:

The higher your credit scores, the better shot you have of getting a loan or credit-card application approved. Improving your credit scores takes time, but it can be done. Start by getting free copies of your three major credit reports at the government-authorized site annualcreditreport.com.

Check your reports for accuracy. Financial columnist Liz Weston, author of “Your Credit Score,” says to look for credit cards or other accounts that aren’t yours, negative entries that are more than 7 years old, duplicate past-due items and an incorrect Social Security number or date of birth.

Dispute errors. Credit bureaus are required by law to investigate mistakes you bring to their attention and report back to you. Typically, they ask the creditor that reported the past-due information to check its records. If the creditor can’t verify the info or doesn’t respond, the item should be deleted.

…………… continues on The Seattle Times
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Five Credit Score Secrets of the Young and FICO-Savvy
News from Fox Business:

If you’re under 30 and want to buy a new car,qualify for a mortgage or apply for a low APR credit card, you’re going to need a high credit score, which can be a challenge for young adults.

Today’s 20-somethings face a tough economy and a stiff lending environment that looks down on applicants with extra-short credit histories — and even shorter resumes. It’s more important than ever, experts say, to break through those age-related obstacles and build a solid financial foundation early.

“The fact is that the young people are going to face a completely different world than we faced,” says Anamaria Lusardi, director of the Financial Literacy Center at Rand Corp. “We are moving into a world of individual responsibility where people are going to be in charge of financial decisions that unfortunately have become very complex. Their financial security depends on them.”

That’s why financial experts say you should start planning now rather than later.

If you’re …………… continues on Fox Business
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Why take an interest in your free credit score?
News from Irvine Herald:

After all, your ‘free credit score’ is sure to turn out to be one of those new-fangled marketing devices that sucker you in with a promise of something really useful, and then leave you high-and-dry after 20 minutes of clicking … unless, of course, you’re prepared to spend money.

To understand why this is different and why it’s worth a look, you need to appreciate what your free credit score is, where it comes from and how it is used. It isn’t something handed out by your bank, though your bank – and the many other financial institutions you hold accounts, credit card or loan agreements with – will input information about you that is taken into account when calculating it.

So, what’s in my free credit report? continues on Irvine Herald
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Complete Idiot’s Guide to Improving Your Credit Score


Get more with a lower score. Credit history can make or break your chances of getting a house, an apartment, or a loan. Now you can stay abreast of your credit score, and your future, by thoroughly understanding the publicly released FICO number, once re
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Five ways the downgrade in US credit rating affects you
News from Washington Post:

Five ways the downgrade in U.S. credit rating affects you

By Ylan Q. Mui,

The impact on your wallet of the Standard & Poor’s downgrade of the nation’s credit rating is similar to what would happen if your own credit score declined: The cost of borrowing money is likely to go up. Here are five things to keep in mind as financial markets respond to this historic event.

1. Uncle Sam’s interest rate may rise.

S&P is one of three major rating agencies that assess the riskiness of large institutions such as corporations and governments. The downgrade reflects a lack of confidence in the U.S. government to pay its debts over time. Riskier countries have to pay higher interest rates, just as riskier consumers do. S&P’s decision rocked the United States — and the world …………… continues on Washington Post
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How to raise credit scores: Five tips
News from Sacramento Bee:

The higher your credit scores, the better shot you have of getting a loan or credit card application approved. Improving your credit scores takes time, but it can be done. Start by getting free copies of your three major credit reports at the government-authorized site annualcreditreport.com.

1. Check your reports for accuracy. Financial columnist Liz Weston, author of “Your Credit Score,” says to look for credit cards or other accounts that aren’t yours, negative entries that are more than seven years old, duplicate past-due items and incorrect Social Security number or date of birth.

2. Dispute errors. Credit bureaus are required by law to investigate mistakes you bring to their attention and report back to you. Typically, they ask the creditor that reported the past-due information to check its records. If the creditor can’t verify the info or doesn’t respond, the item should be deleted.

3. Pay your bills on time. Payment history makes up more than one-third …………… continues on Sacramento Bee
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How to Repair Your Credit Score Now: Simple No Cost Methods You Can Put to Use Today

Your credit score affects every aspect of your financial life including qualifying for loans and mortgages, low interest rates, housing, employment opportunities, and even insurance premiums. Millions of Americans have negative, inaccurate, and unverifiable information on their credit report. Repairing your credit profile is one of the most important financial decisions you can make. You re about to take the important step of taking control of your credit! If you re like the average American, ha

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